Inicio / Hematología / Abstracts de hematología / Worldwide comparison of survival from childhood leukaemia for 1995–2009, by subtype, age, and sex (CONCORD-2): a population-based study of individual data for 89 828 children from 198 registries in 53 countries

Worldwide comparison of survival from childhood leukaemia for 1995–2009, by subtype, age, and sex (CONCORD-2): a population-based study of individual data for 89 828 children from 198 registries in 53 countries

0 / 5 (0 votos)
Worldwide comparison of survival from childhood leukaemia for 1995–2009, by subtype, age, and sex (CONCORD-2): a population-based study of individual data for 89 828 children from 198 registries in 53 countries

The Lancet Haematology
Volume 4, No. 5, e202–e217, May 2017

Dr Audrey Bonaventure, MD, Rhea Harewood, MSc, Charles A Stiller, MSc, Gemma Gatta, MD, Jacqueline Clavel, MD, Daniela C Stefan, MD, Helena Carreira, MSc, Devon Spika, MSc, Rafael Marcos-Gragera, PhD, Prof Rafael Peris-Bonet, PhD, Marion Piñeros, MD, Milena Sant, MD, Claudia E Kuehni, MD, Michael F G Murphy, MSc, Prof Michel P Coleman, FFPH, Claudia Allemani, PhD the CONCORD Working Group

Abstract

Background

Global inequalities in access to health care are reflected in differences in cancer survival. The CONCORD programme was designed to assess worldwide differences and trends in population-based cancer survival. In this population-based study, we aimed to estimate survival inequalities globally for several subtypes of childhood leukaemia.

Methods

Cancer registries participating in CONCORD were asked to submit tumour registrations for all children aged 0–14 years who were diagnosed with leukaemia between Jan 1, 1995, and Dec 31, 2009, and followed up until Dec 31, 2009. Haematological malignancies were defined by morphology codes in the International Classification of Diseases for Oncology, third revision. We excluded data from registries from which the data were judged to be less reliable, or included only lymphomas, and data from countries in which data for fewer than ten children were available for analysis. We also excluded records because of a missing date of birth, diagnosis, or last known vital status. We estimated 5-year net survival (ie, the probability of surviving at least 5 years after diagnosis, after controlling for deaths from other causes [background mortality]) for children by calendar period of diagnosis (1995–99, 2000–04, and 2005–09), sex, and age at diagnosis (<1, 1–4, 5–9, and 10–14 years, inclusive) using appropriate life tables. We estimated age-standardised net survival for international comparison of survival trends for precursor-cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) and acute myeloid leukaemia (AML).

SEGUIR LEYENDO

Comentarios

Para dejar un comentario antes debes iniciar sesión:

¿No tienes una cuenta?

Regístrate a través de éste enlace.